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Date and Time of the Query: 2019-05-26 T14:53:22 PDT
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Notes for object NGC 2787

14 note(s) found in NED.


1. 2008MNRAS.386.2242H
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787. It has a spectacular tilted nuclear dust ring of radius ~1.5-10
arcsec (Sarzi et al. 2001; Erwin et al. 2003), an inner disc (Erwin 2004)
and a bulge with disc-like kinetic property (Erwin 2007). NGC 3384 has an
inner disc (Erwin 2004) and a bulge with disc-like kinetic property (de
Zeeuw et al. 2002). NGC 2787 and NGC 3384 are the examples of the galaxies
contain composite structures consisting of both pseudo-bulges and small
inner classical bulges (Erwin 2007).

2. 2008MNRAS.386.2242H
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787 - T02 give {sigma}_e_ = 140 km s^-1^ , while in the literature
much higher value is quoted, e.g. 210 km s^-1^ (Dalle Ore et al. 1991),
205 km s^-1^ (Neistein et al. 1999), 202 km s^-1^ (Barth, Ho & Sargent
2002) and 257 km s^-1^ (Erwin et al. 2003). As pointed by Aller et al.
(2007), this discrepancy may stem from the central peak in the velocity
dispersion profile. We estimate ?e and ?c from fig. 1 of Bertola et al.
(1995). (iii)

3. 2008MNRAS.386.2242H
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787. It has a spectacular tilted nuclear dust ring of radius ~1.5-10
arcsec (Sarzi et al.2001; Erwin et al.2003), an inner disc (Erwin 2004 and a
bulge with disc-like kinetic property (Erwin 2007). NGC 3384 has an inner disc
(Erwin 2004)and a bulge with disc-like kinetic property(de Zeeuw et al. 2002).
NGC 2787 and NGC 3384 are the examples of the galaxies contain composite
structures consisting of both pseudo-bulges and small inner classical bulges
(Erwin 2007).

4. 2008MNRAS.386.2242H
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787 -T02 give {sigma}_e_= 140 km s^-1^, while in the literature much
higher value is quoted, e.g. 210 km s^-1^ (Dalle Ore et al. 1991),205 km s^-1^
(Neistein et al. 1999), 202 km s^-1^ (Barth, Ho & Sargent 2002) and 257 km s^-1^
(Erwin et al. 2003). As pointed by Aller et al. (2007), this discrepancy may
stem from the central peak in the velocity dispersion profile. We estimate
{sigma}_e_ and {sigma}_c_ from fig. 1 of Bertola et al. (1995).

5. 2005ApJ...627..674A
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787.Falcke et al. (2000) found a peak flux density of 11.2 mJy beam^-1^ in
their 5.0 GHz VLBA observations from 1997 June 16. Combined with 15 GHz VLA
observations by Nagar et al. (2000) from 1996 October, they calculated a
spectral index of {alpha}^5.0^_15_ = -0.45. Our 8.4 GHz VLBA measurement is
brighter than both of these previous observations. Our observation has a
peak-to-rms-noise ratio of almost 400 but shows no sign of any extended
emission. The jmfit deconvolved size is only about 0.20 mas.

6. 2004A&A...415..941E
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787 (inner disk): Erwin (2000); see Erwin & Sparke (2003). The
inner disk is discussed in greater detail in Erwin et al. (2003).

7. 2003ApJ...583..145T
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787 (L1.9). A result on the same data set is presented in
Ho et al. (2001). Our detected number of counts is in good agreement
with their result.

8. 2002ApJ...574..740T
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787, NGC 4459, NGC 4596.
The black hole masses are based on Space Telescope Imaging
Spectrograph (STIS) measurements of ionized-gas disks by
Sarzi et al. (2001). The disk inclinations are determined from
dust-lane morphology. Note that the distance and dispersion for
NGC 2787, 7.5 Mpc and 140 km s^-1^, are much smaller than the
values assumed by Sarzi et al. (2001). Our distance is from
Tonry et al. (2001), and the dispersion was measured by one
of us (Gebhardt). For NGC 4459 and NGC 4596, we have used the
dispersions {sigma}'_8_ from Sarzi et al. (2001), since on average
these are close to {sigma}_1_ (eq. [16]).

9. 2000ApJ...542..186N
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787.-Heckman, Balick, & Crane (1980) find 20 and 6 cm peak flux
densities of less than 9 and 9 mJy beam^-1^ at resolutions of 4" and
1.7", respectively, so the nucleus has a flat or inverted spectrum
between 20 and 6 cm, {alpha}_6_^20^ >= 0. Combining the 6 cm peak flux
density with our 2 cm peak flux densities of 7 and 8.9 mJy beam^-1^ at
resolutions of 0.15" and 5", respectively, results in a nonsimultaneous
spectral index, {alpha}_2_^6^ between -0.2 and 0, for all emission
within the central 1.7".

10. 1997ApJS..112..391H
Re:NGC 2787
NGC 2787.--All of the narrow lines can be well modeled by the profile deduced
from the [S II] lines. Contrary to the conclusion reached in Paper I, in which
the starlight was not yet removed from the spectrum, a fairly prominent
(f_blend_~35%) broad H{alpha} line is present in NGC 2787 (Fig. 9a). The
extended red wing and apparent offset of the central wavelength of the broad
line are most likely artifacts of the depression in the residuals shortward of
~6520 A. The exact parameters of the broad H{alpha} line in this case are very
sensitive to the choice of template, and we have adopted the one shown to
achieve the best starlight subtraction over the entire spectrum.

11. 1994CAG1..B...0000S
Re:NGC 2787
SB0/a
(VE,L,0)
PH-7588-S
April 2/3, 1979
IIIaJ + GG385
30 min
Racine wedge
NGC 2787 is another example of the form
often described on this page. The galaxy is
evidently highly inclined to the line of sight because
of the large flattening of the disk and the partial
ring enhancement at the two ends of the bar.

12. 1994CAG1..B...0000S
Re:NGC 2787
Not in RSA
SB0/a
(VE,L,0)
PH-7588-S
April 2/3, 1979
IIIaJ + GG385
30 min
NGC 2787 is also shown in the SB0 section
(SB0/a; panel 57) in a negative print made from
the same plate used here. The ansae at the ends
of a diffuse bar emerging from the flattened
central bulge terminate on the rim of the disk
(called the lens in the Hubble Atlas). The pattern
is similar to that in IC 346 above.

13. 1973UGC...C...0000N
Re:UGC 04914
SB(r)0+ (de Vaucouleurs)

14. 1964RC1...C...0000d
Re:NGC 2787
Very small, bright nucleus in a bright inner lens: 0.5 arcmin x 0.3 arcmin.
Strong narrow bar with blobs. Faint (r): 1.4 arcmin x 0.75 arcmin.
See also M.N.R.A.S., 74, 242, 1914.
Heidelberg Veroff. Vol. 9, 1926 dimensions: (0.7? arcmin x 0.5? arcmin)
rejected, nucleus only.


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