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Notes for object NGC 3783

34 note(s) found in NED.


1. 2009ApJ...705..962C
Re:NGC 3783
The Si III profile shows clear negative velocity high-velocity gas spread over
two components, the higher-velocity component of which is detectable in H I
emission as HVC WW187 (Wakker et al. 2003). The high-velocity gas was first
noticed in the STIS data by Gabel et al. (2003). The features are clearly seen
as two components in nearly all low ion absorption lines in the E140M bandpass,
but are not seen in C IV or Si IV lines.

2. 2009ApJ...690.1322W
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3728. NGC 3783 has a complex spectrum, which has been observed with
a 900 ks Chandra observation. A very significant ({DELTA}{chi}^2^ = 214)
blackbody component was also added with kT = 63.4^+0.6^ _-0.7_ eV and a
normalization of 0.008

3. 2008A&A...484..341R
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783 is a nearly face-on SBa galaxy with a very bright, highly variable,
Seyfert 1 nucleus. The image shows an unresolved point source.

4. 2007ApJ...671.1388D
Re:NGC 3783
A2.6. NGC 3783
At near-infrared wavelengths, the AGN in NGC 3783 is remarkably bright.
Integrated over the central 0.5" less than 4% of the K-band continuum is
stellar. In addition, the broad Brackett lines are very strong and dominate the
H band. Both of these phenomena are immediately clear from the H- and K-band
spectra in Figure 24. However, it does mean that the spatial resolution can be
measured easily from both the nonstellar continuum and the broad emission lines
(see {section} 2). We find the K-band PSF to be symmetrical with an FWHM of
0.17".
Due to the ubiquitous Brackett emission in the H band, we were unable to
reliably trace the stellar absorption features and map out the stellar
continuum. Instead, we have used the CO(2-0) band head at 2.3 {mu}m even
though the dilution at the nucleus itself is extreme. The azimuthally
averaged radial profile is shown in Figure 25 together with the PSF for
reference. At radii from 0.2" to 1.6" (the maximum we can measure) the
profile is well fitted by an r^1/4^ de Vaucouleurs law with R_eff_ = 0.6" (120
pc). As has been the case previously, at smaller radii we find an excess that
here is perhaps marginally resolved. Thus, a substantial fraction of the
near-infrared stellar continuum in the central region is likely to originate
in a population of stars distinct from the bulge.

5. 2007ApJ...671.1388D
Re:NGC 3783
We were unable to measure the stellar kinematics due to the limited
signal-to-noise ratio. Instead, we used the molecular gas kinematics to estimate
the dynamical mass. As before, we used kinemetry to derive the position angle of
-14{degree} and the inclination in the range 35{degree}-39{degree}. This
orientation is consistent with the larger (20") scale isophotes in the J-band
2MASS image and implies that in NGC 3783 there is no significant warp on scales
of 50 pc-4 kpc. A small inclination is also consistent with its classification
as a Seyfert 1. Adopting these values, the resulting rotation curve is shown in
Figure 26. At very small radii the rising rotation curve may be the result of
beam smearing across the nucleus. At r > 0.2 , the falling curve suggests that
the rotation is dominated by the central (r < 0.2) mass, perhaps the
supermassive black hole. We estimate the dynamical mass within a radius of 0.3"
(60 pc), corresponding to the point where the excess continuum begins and also
where the rotation curve appears to be unaffected by beam smearing.
Taking V_rot_ = 60 km s^-1^ and {sigma} = 35 km s^-1^, we derive a dynamical
mass of M_dyn_ = 1.0 * 10^8^ M_sun_. The black hole mass of 3 x 10^7^ M_sun_
(from reverberation mapping; Peterson et al. 2004) is only 30% of this and so
cannot be dominating the dynamics on this scale unless its mass is
underestimated. With respect to this, we note that Peterson et al. (2004) claim
that the statistical uncertainty in masses derived from reverberation mapping is
about a factor of 3. Alternatively, there may be a compact mass of gas and stars
at < 0.3". However, including {sigma} in the mass estimate implicitly assumes
that the dispersion arises from macroscopic motions. On the other hand, because
we are observing only the hot H_2_, it is possible that the dispersion is
dominated by turbulence arising from shocks or UV heating of clouds that
generate the 1-0 S(1) emission, issues that are discussed in more detail by E.
K. S. Hicks et al. (2008, in preparation). In this case we will have
overestimated the dynamical mass. Excluding {sigma} from the mass estimation
yields M_dyn_ = 5 *10^7^ M_sun_. We consider these two estimates as denoting the
maximum range of possible masses. Subtracting M_BH_ then gives a mass of stars
and gas in the range (2-7) * 10^7^ M_sun_, implying a mass surface density of
1700-6000 M_sun_ pc^-2^ and M/L_K_ = 0.6-2.1 M_sun_L_sun_^-1^. Based on these
ratios alone, Figure 4 indicates that the characteristic age of the star
formation may be as low as ~70 Myr, although it could also be an order of
magnitude greater. Without additional diagnostics we cannot discriminate
further. We are unable to use Br{gamma} as an additional constraint on the star
formation history. Its morphology and velocity field are similar to that of [SI
VI] and rather different from the 1-0 S(1). It shows an extension to the north
that appears to be outflowing at >50 km s^-1^ (Fig. 27), perhaps tracing an
ionization cone. Since the Br{gamma} resembles the [Si vi], it is reasonable to
conclude that it too is associated with the AGN rather than star formation.
Thus, the equivalent width of Br{gamma} (with respect to the stellar continuum)
of W_Br{gamma}_ A represents an upper limit to that associated with star
formation.

6. 2007ApJ...671.1388D
Re:NGC 3783
The radio continuum in the nucleus of NGC 3783 has been measured with several
beam sizes at 8.5 GHz. For a beam of 1.59" * 0.74", Morganti et al. (1999) found
that it was unresolved with a flux density of 8.15+/- 0.254 mJy. With a smaller
~0.25" beam, Schmitt et al. (2001) measured a total flux density of 8.0 mJy
dominated by an unresolved component of 7.7 +/- 0.05 mJy. At smaller scales
still of ~0.03" corresponding to 6 pc, Sadler et al. (1995) placed an upper
limit on the 8.5 GHz flux density of 7 mJy. Taken together, these results imply
that there is some modest 8.5 GHz radio continuum of 0.7-1 mJy extended on
scales of 0.3"-1". Based on this, we estimate a supernova rate as described in
{section} 3 of ~0.007 yr^-1^, and hence a ratio 10^10 {nu}_SN_/L_K_ ~ 2 . Given
that the unresolved radio continuum on the smallest scales is an upper limit,
the extended component may be stronger and hence the true {nu}_SN_/L_K_ ratio
may be greater than that estimated here. Figure 4 then puts a relatively strong
limit of ~50 Myr on the maximum age of th e star formation. This age is fully
consistent with that above associated with our lower mass estimate. The value of
W_Br{gamma}_ < 30 A above does not impose additional constraints, although we
note that if the Br{gamma} flux associated with star formation is only a small
fraction of the total, then it would imply that the timescale over which the
star formation was active is no longer than a few times ~10 Myr. Therefore, in
the nucleus (r < 0.3" ) of NGC 3783 we adopt 50-70 Myr as the age of the star
formation and M_dyn_ = 2 * 10^7^ M_sun_ as the dynamical mass excluding the
central supermassive black hole.

7. 2007AJ....134.1061D
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783 was heavily studied by Gabel et al. (2005) using STIS and FUSE spectra.
We find two broad components covering the span between -500 and -800 km s^-1^,
which agrees with Gabel et al. (2005). However, Gabel et al. found a component
at -1350 km s^-1^ that is coincident with a feature in Ly{BETA}; the O VI lines
are somewhat less convincing in the FUSE spectrum.

8. 2007A&A...461.1209D
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783: De Rosa et al. (2002b) presented these data. The source is
known to display an important soft excess that is also detected
considering only the data above ~2 keV. The broadband spectrum of the
source, as modeled here, is in agrement with what was previously
presented (De Rosa et al. 2002b; Perola et al. 2002).

9. 2004MNRAS.350.1049G
Re:NGC 3783
9.16 NGC 3783 The data now presented stretch about 3000 d beyond those
of Glass (1992) which suggested the existence of a delay of about 80 d
between U and L. The data now available now suggest a delay of about 190
d. It should be noted, however, that the sampling is rather inadequately
spaced.

10. 2004ApJ...613..682P
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783. This was the second major multiwavelength campaign undertaken
by the International AGN Watch (Reichert et al. 1994; Stirpe et
al. 1994). This object was completely reanalyzed by Onken & Peterson
(2002); new UV light curves based on IUE NEWSIPS data were measured, and
the optical spectra were completely recalibrated using the van Groningen
& Wanders (1992) algorithm. The results presented here are based on the
Onken & Peterson reanalysis.

11. 2004ApJ...607..309I
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783.-The sight line to the nucleus of this Seyfert I galaxy passes
through the interior of Loop I and through the HVC 287.5+22.5+240.
Sembach et al. (2001a) report on the FUSE observations of this
high-velocity gas and argue that it is the leading edge of the
Magellanic Stream. As they point out, any O VI absorption in the
high-velocity gas (high positive or negative velocities) is obscured by
intrinsic Ly{beta} absorption: NGC 3783 has a redshift of 2929 +- 3 km
s^-1^ (Theureau et al. 1998) and prominent absorbers at -560 and -1420
km s^-1^ (Crenshaw et al. 1999). The current data show no definite C IV
or N V absorption at |v|>~100 km s^-1^, strengthening the claim that
little of the observed absorption near 1031 {Angstrom} is O VI.

12. 2004A&A...428..373B
Re:NGC 3783
4.3. NGC 3783. NGC 3783 is a nearly face-on SBa galaxy with a very
bright, highly variable, Seyfert 1 nucleus, which we observed along the
minor axis (PA = 77deg). Only the stellar content of the extranuclear
regions can be analyzed.
The nearest region to the nucleus that can be analyzed is a ring
located 630 pc from it (extending from 370 to 890 pc). From the data in
Table 2, it can be seen that most of the main sequence stars in this
region are poorly defined. Nevertheless we can be confident that at
least 50% of the stellar light is due to the presence of an old, mainly
giant and metal rich population. The observed spectrum requires a small
dereddening of E(B - V) = 0.04 in order to match the synthetic spectrum
as shown in Fig. 5.
The old stellar component is well defined while the contribution from
dwarfs and/or hot stars is loosely defined, which could suggest that the
stellar library is not well suited for application to the case of
NGC 3783, or more probably that some scattered light from the nucleus is
present in our extra-nuclear spectrum, and is responsible for increased
photometric errors in the blue part of the spectrum. Actually we note
that the agreement is not very good, in particular at both ends of the
spectra.
Winge et al. (1990) found that the stellar population in a region of
the bulge, which is twice as far away from the nucleus as the region we
consider here, can be represented by the S4 stellar template of Bica
(1988): a mostly old population of solar metallicity with some
contributions from intermediate age and young stars.
This suggests that the bulge is quite homogeneous with some metallicity
gradient.

13. 2004A&A...428..373B
Re:NGC 3783
4.3 NGC 3783 is a nearly face-on SBa galaxy with a very bright, highly
variable, Seyfert 1 nucleus, which we observed along the minor axis
(PA = 77deg). Only the stellar content of the extranuclear regions can be
analyzed.
The nearest region to the nucleus that can be analyzed is a ring
located 630 pc from it (extending from 370 to 890 pc). From the data in
Table 2, it can be seen that most of the main sequence stars in this region
are poorly defined. Nevertheless we can be confident that at least 50% of
the stellar light is due to the presence of an old, mainly giant and
metal rich population. The observed spectrum requires a small
dereddening of E(B-V)=0.04 in order to match the synthetic spectrum as
shown in Fig. 5.
The old stellar component is well defined while the contribution from
dwarfs and/or hot stars is loosely defined, which could suggest that the
stellar library is not well suited for application to the case of NGC
3783, or more probably that some scattered light from the nucleus is
present in our extra-nuclear spectrum, and is responsible for increased
photometric errors in the blue part of the spectrum. Actually we note
that the agreement is not very good, in particular at both ends of the
spectra.
Winge et al. (1990) found that the stellar population in a region of the
bulge, which is twice as far away from the nucleus as the region we
consider here, can be represented by the S4 stellar template of Bica
(1988): a mostly old population of solar metallicity with some
contributions from intermediate age and young stars.
This suggests that the bulge is quite homogeneous with some metallicity
gradient.

14. 2003MNRAS.343..192R
Re:NGC 3783
3.7 NGC 3783 NGC 3783 is an (R')SB(r)a galaxy with a Sy 1 nucleus. It is
the most distant (z = 0.00973; distance = 38.6 Mpc) galaxy in our
sample, but one of the closest Sy1s, and thus has been extensively
studied (e.g. Maran et al. 1996). It has all inner ring (diameter ~35
arcsec, 6.7 kpc) with star formation activity circling a strong stellar
bar (PA = 163deg), and thin tightly wound spiral arms emerging from this
ring (e.g. Mulchaey et al. 1997). NGC 3783 has extremely broad Balmer
and He lines which are blueshifted relative to the systemic velocity
(Evans 1988).
Non-stellar continuum appears to dominate the overall spectrum of NGC
3783 (Fig. 8). The strongest line within the nuclear aperture is the
broad (~2630 km s^-1^) Br{gamma}. Other lines detected are 1-0 S(1),
[Fe II], He I, H-band Brackett lines and three coronal lines. Similar to
the case of NGC 3081, NGC 3783 is rather distant and faint, and each line
can only be traced up to ~1 arcsec (200 pc) from the nucleus
(Fig. 4). Thus, no kinematical analysis can be presented for NGC 3783.
Similar to the case of NGC 2992, in addition to broad Br{gamma}, a faint
broad He I line is detected (Fig. 2). This line also appears to be
double-peaked, in contrast to Br{gamma}(Fig. 10). The width of He I
(~3700 km s^-1^) is broader than that of Br{gamma}, and the peaks are
separated by 1000 km s^-1^. In the H-band, other Brackett transition
lines are detected (Br 10-4 1.737 {microns}, Br 11-4 1.681 {microns} and
Br 12-4 1.641 {moicrons}). Their ratios against Br{gamma} indicate that
the BLR is unobscured.
The upper limit to the 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(1) ratio is ~0.3 (T_vib_ < 4800
K), while for fluorescent emission the expected ratio is ~0.5. Thus we
cannot exclude the contribution from fluorescent H_2_ emission. The
density of the excited H_2_ in the nucleus N_H_2__~= 3.2 x 10^17^ cm^-2^
(corresponding to M_H_2__ 290 M_{sun}_).
Three coronal lines are detected in NGC 3783: [Si VI] 1.964 {microns},
[Ca VIII] 2.321 {microns} and [Si VII] 2.483 {microns}. [Si VI] and
[Si VII] are both spatially resolved in the nucleus but no additional
extended emission is detected. The FWHM size of the nuclear emission
source (corrected for the instrumental resolution) is ~0.7 arcsec with
no significant difference between the directions. In addition, there
appears to be a faint [Al IX] line detected at a 2.5{sigma} level
blended with the broad He I line, but higher signal-to-noise ratio
spectra are required to confirm its presence.

15. 2003ApJS..148..327S
Re:NGC 3783
5.33. NGC 3783
This Seyfert 1 galaxy has a halo-like NLR with [O III] emission
extended over a region of 1.9" (310 pc) in diameter around the
nucleus (Fig. 10, middle left). Ground-based narrowband observations
by Winge et al. (1992) found only an unresolved source, and the radio
emission also is unresolved (Schmitt et al. 2001a).

16. 2003ApJS..146....1W
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783.-Although this is a bright object with a high S/N spectrum, the
contamination by both H_2_ and intrinsic lines is too severe to allow a
reliable measurement of the Galactic O VI line, even though it is
clearly present.

17. 2002A&A...389..802P
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783. The BMS fit is poor ( {chi}^2^=208/150), with
an excess in the residuals at low energies. With the
addition of a line the {chi}^2^ reduces to 160/147,
with E_l_ = 0.59 keV and W_l_ = 140 eV: its strength is
however almost ten times larger than that of the OVII
emission lines detected by Kaspi et al. (2001) in a
Chandra HETGS observation (when the source was fainter
by only about 15%). A formally better improvement is
achieved if, instead of a line, a black body is added,
provided the temperature of the warm absorber is set
equal to 10^5^ K: the parameters given in Table 2 refer
to this fit. N_s_ is negligible compared to N_g_,
N_W_=(9.6^+3.2^_-1.4_) x 10^21^cm^-2^, with
X_i_ ~ 15 erg cm s^-1^, the black body
kT=0.18^+0.02^_-0.03_ keV. The iron line is definitely
resolved. The Chandra HETGS observation (Kaspi et al. 2001)
has revealed a narrow line at 6.4 keV, with an upper
limit on the width ({sigma} less than 0.030 keV) that
places its origin beyond the BLR: its intensity of
(6.6 +/- 2.1) x 10^-5^ cm^-2^ s^-1^ is about 55% of that
measured by us. If we include in the fit a narrow, in
addition to the broad line, no improvement is attained in
{chi}^2^ and the intensity of the narrow component is not
well constrained, such that a value identical to that from
the Chandra observation is acceptable. In a recent
publication (De Rosa et al. 2002) on this BeppoSAX
observation, the same model adopted by us (their Model E)
yields somewhat different values, in particular
{GAMMA} = 18.6 +/- 0.03, R=0.71^+0.20^_-0.28_,
W_{alpha} = 210 +/- 45, together with N_W_ about twice
larger. The discrepancy is due to the different code
adopted to describe the warm absorber, and it is not
such as to influence the conclusions of the analysis
following in Sect. 4. We note on the other hand the good
agreement in our values of{GAMMA} and N_W_ with those
obtained by Kaspi et al. (2001) in fitting the
"line free zones" of the HETGS spectral data with a
power law and a warm absorber.

18. 2002A&A...389...68G
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783: the HII regions of this catalog populate an inner ring.
Nevertheless, our two methods are in good agreement with the only
PA value that we found in the literature and with the IA of
RC3 (1991). There is also a rough agreement with the IA values from
other studies. We adopt the mean of our methods.

19. 2001ApJS..136...61S
Re:NGC 3783
5.19. NGC 3783
NGC 3783 is a nearly face-on spiral galaxy hosting a very bright (e.g.,
Alloin et al. 1995 and references therein) Seyfert 1 nucleus (note the
very broad Br{gamma} emission in our K-band spectra). Alloin et al. (1995)
find that if the {alpha} = 1 power law that fits the 0.1 MeV-0.1 keV
emission is extended to longer wavelengths, the resulting IR excess is
explainable by a ~60 M_sun_ mass of dust with temperatures in the range
200-1500 K. Our K-band spectrum also shows evidence for substantial hot
dust emission. H_2_ 1-0 S(1) line emission from the central 3.4" x 6.8"
has been marginally detected (Kawara, Nishida, & Gregory 1989), consistent
with our upper limit.

20. 2001ApJ...550..261W
Re:NGC 3783
3.3.5. NGC 3783
Among the six observations of this source, the flux is seen to vary by
as much as ~70% (Fig. 8e). The line energy changes by ~3%, but there is no
clear relationship between line energy and flux, with the line having its
highest energies during both low and medium flux states. The statistics are
too poor to search for variability in the line flux, but the line EW
reaches its largest value during the first observation, when the continuum
is weakest.

21. 1999A&AS..137..457M
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783: The object is unresolved in our 8 GHz observations and was
also reported unresolved by Ulvestad & Wilson (1984b) who give a flux
density of 13 mJy at 6 cm. A spectral index of {alpha}_6_^3^ = -0.55 is
derived from Ulvestad & Wilson (1984b) and our flux measurements. An
upper limit (S < 5 mJy) was obtained from the PTI observations at 13 cm
(R94).

22. 1998ApJS..114...73G
Re:NGC 3783
Section 7.1. NGC 3783
Two data sets of NGC 3783, separated by 4 days, are contained within our
sample from observations carried out in 1993 December. As shown in Section
5.3-5.6, there is clear evidence for ionized gas in this source, with models
B(i)-C(ii) providing acceptable fits to both data sets. The observed count
rate was ~25% higher for the second observation (see, e.g., Table 2), which
is reflected in an increase in the derived luminosity of the ionizing
continuum [for model C(i), after correcting for absorption] from
L_X_ ~ 4.6 x 10^43^ ergs s^-1^ to ~5.5 x 10^43^ ergs s^-1^. Both observations
are consistent with {GAMMA} ~ 1.8, D_f_ = 0, U_X_ ~ 0.1-0.15, and
N_H, z_ ~ 2 x 10^22^ cm^-2^ (Table 8). However, as shown in Figure 16, the
two data sets actually occupy slightly different regions of the N_H, z_-U_X_
tfplane, consistent with an increase in U_X_ by <~40% and/or a decrease in
N_H, z_ (by <~ 5 x 10^21^ cm^-2^) between the two epochs. The former offers
the simplest interpretation of these data: a screen of ionized gas completely
covers t he cylinder of sight in NGC 3783, becoming more highly ionized as
the photoionizing flux increases. Both observations are consistent with the
presence of emission from the ionized material, with L_e_ ~ 2-6 x 10^42^
ergs s^-1^ in the 0.1-10 keV band (after correcting for absorption).
Unfortunately, however, the signal-to-noise ratio of these data sets is too
low to determine unambiguously whether the intensity of this emission
responded to the increase in the ionizing continuum.
.
Interestingly, a "1 keV deficit" was also evident for both data sets in the
data/model residuals of all the models considered in Section 5. This can be
modeled by an additional absorption edge ({tau}_ONe_ ~ 0.5) at an energy
close to that of O VIII (Section 6.2) and most likely due to an additional
screen of more highly ionized gas covering part, or all, the cylinder of
sight.

23. 1998ApJS..114...73G
Re:NGC 3783
Section A6. NGC 3783
This Seyfert 1.2 galaxy was first detected in X-rays by Ariel V (Cooke et al.
1976). Absorption due to ionized gas in NGC 3783 was first suggested by ROSAT
PSPC observations (Turner et al. 1993). In our analysis of the data from two
ASCA observations separated by 4 days in 1993 December, we find models
involving absorption by neutral material [model A(i) and A(ii)] to provide
unsatisfactory descriptions of the spectra. However, fits satisfying our
criteria for acceptability are obtained if the absorbing gas is assumed to be
ionized [models B(i) and B(ii)], with a significant improvement in the
goodness of fit with the inclusion of the ionized emitter [models C(i) and
C(ii)]. In all cases, the parameters of the ionized gas are fairly well
constrained, with U_X_ ~ 0.1-0.15 and N_H, z_ ~ 2 x 10^22^ cm^-2^ (e.g.,
Fig. 16). This confirms the findings of George et al. (1995) and R97 who
found the addition of O VII and O VIII edges (of optical depths {tau}_O7_ ~
1.2 and {tau}_O8_ ~ 1.4) significantly improved the fit to a single-power-law
model ({GAMMA} ~ 1.4) to these ASCA data. R97 also fitted a single-zone
photoionization model and found U^R97^_X_ ~ 0.08, N_H, z_ ~ 2 x 10^22^
cm^-2^, and {GAMMA} ~ 1.7. The index derived for these ASCA observations
(~1.8) is somewhat steeper than that found by George et al. (1995), primarily
due to these workers not adequately modeling the Fe K-band. A flatter
spectral index has also been suggested by some (but not all) previous
observations in the 2-10 keV band (see, e.g., Ghosh et al. 1992). This may
indicate spectral variability or (more likely) be an artifact of incorrectly
modeling the deep absorption troughs owing to the ionized gas in this source.
As described in Section 7.1, the behavior of the ionized gas in response to
the change in flux seen between the two ASCA observations is consistent with
expectations. NP94 found evidence for absorption by ionized gas with
N_H, z_ ~ 10^23^ cm^-2^, higher than that observed here.
.
UV observations of NGC 3783 have revealed absorption due to Ly{alpha}, N V,
and C IV, with the latter exhibiting variability on a timescale of <~6 months
(Reichert et al. 1994; Lu, Savage, & Sembach 1994; Maran et al. 1996).
Shields & Hamann (1997) have compared the implied column densities with the
photoionization modeling of the X-ray absorption presented in George et al.
(1995). While alternative scenarios could not be excluded, they found the UV
and X-ray results to be consistent with a single-phase, photoionized plasma.
By comparing the observed variability timescale in C IV with the radiative
recombination, they derived a density n >~ 50 cm^-3^ for the ionized gas and
hence, from the ionization parameter, a location r <~ 30 pc from the ionizing
source. Since the parameters associated with the X-ray absorption are
generally consistent with those in George et al. (1995), we agree with the
conclusions of Shields & Hamann (1997).

24. 1997MNRAS.286..513R
Re:NGC 3783
7.1.7 NGC 3783
The Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783 is one of the two objects displaying deep, warm
oxygen edges but little or no optical/UV reddening (the other being NGC 3516).
The photoionized absorber has been discussed in Section 5.1. Alloin et al.
(1995) have presented a snapshot of the continuum emission from radio
wavelengths through to {gamma}-rays. They show the existence of a classical big
blue bump in the UV (confirming the small UV extinction towards this source)
and an IR bump. The IR bump is interpreted as originating from dust at
temperatures ranging from the sublimation temperature (T~1500K) down to that of
relatively cool grains (T~200K). These observations support the hypothesis of
the existence of dusty warm (photoionized) plasma which, in this object, is out
of the line of sight to the central continuum source (see Sections 4.2.2 and
8.2.2).

25. 1997ApJS..110..299M
Re:NGC 3783
Bar is visible in both the ellipse fits and the K_S_image.

26. 1996ApJ...463..498S
Re:NGC 3783
A6. NGC 3783
An unresolved nuclear point source is detected in radio observations (Ulvestad
& Wilson 1984b), ground-based observations (Winge et al. 1992), and the WF/PC 1
[O III] images presented here (Kinney et al. 1992). The emission-line image of
this galaxy is pointlike, with no evidence of extended emission. The total
extent of the emission is 0.8" (130 pc). Residuals of the deconvolution are
apparent in the image.

27. 1995ApJ...447..121W
Re:NGC 3783
NGC 3783.-An Fe K feature is detected at 99% confidence with an EW
consistent with that seen by Ginga (NP94). The upper limit on N_HFe_ is
inconsistent with Ginga; however, the average low-energy absorbing column
was lower during the HEAO 1 epoch.

28. 1994CAG1..B...0000S
Re:NGC 3783
SBa(r)I
(I,I,1/4)
CD-158-S
Feb 3/4, 1978
103aO + GG385
45 min
NGC 3783 is the latest SBa(r) galaxy in the RSA. The tightness of
the arm wrap, the regularity of the spiral pattern, and the small
(albeit finite) rate of star formation in the thin arms show that the
type is earlier than SBb but clearly later than early SBa. As with NGC
7371 on the preceding panel, NGC 3783 defines the boundary between
late SBa and the early SBab types.

29. 1994CAG1..B...0000S
Re:NGC 3783
SBa(r)I
(I,I,1/4)
CD-158-S
Feb 3/4, 1978
103aO + GG385
45 min
The well-defined bar terminates on the rim
of a not-quite-complete ring in NGC 3783. In the
upper-left part of the bar (position angle 9:30
o'clock in the print here) the high-surface-brightness
ring begins slightly beyond (below on the
print) the terminus of the bar. Following the ring
clockwise, it bifurcates at about 12 o'clock. The
upper segment spirals outward to form one of the
outer smooth arms traceable subsequently for at
least 1 1/4 revolutions, similar, for example, to
NGC 7096 (Sa; panels 68, 88, S3). A more-complicated
description is necessary for the spiral
pattern beginning near the bar terminus on the
lower-right part of the major axis.
Note, however, that the arms are difficult to
trace as single units. They fragment into
branches and can only approximately be
connected as continuous entities. This, of course,
is the description of the multiple-armed-spiral
(MAS) type of pattern discussed in the Sa section.

30. 1991ApJ...381...85T
Re:NGC 3783
No spectral fit was obtained for the SSS data, which were contaminated by
some unknown component, and thus this source is not included in the sample
discussed here. The MPC data alone indicated a steep but poorly constrained
spectrum [{GAMMA} = 1.95 (0.6-6.7)({chi}^2^+4.61)], in contrast to the flat
spectrum obtained from EXOSAT, HEAO 1, and Ariel 5 data. The poor quality of
the Einstein data leaves the question of spectral variability inconclusive in
this case.

31. 1985SGC...C...0000C
Re:NGC 3783
Plate 1317
Overexposed center. Pretty smooth arms. Bright star 1.2 south-following.
Plate 2857
Overexposed bar and (r): 0.55 x 0.5.

32. 1982ESOU..C...0000L
Re:ESO 113633-3727.7
=ESO 378- G 14
Seyfert-type
*Tololo 1136-374

33. 1976RC2...C...0000d
Re:NGC 3783
Type 1 Seyfert nucleus.
Photograph:
Ap. J., 189, 187, 1974.
M.N.R.A.S., 168, 109, 1974.
Photometry:
Rosario Ast. Obs. Bol., No. 2, 5, 1972.
Photometry (UBV):
Bol.A.A. Argentina, No. 16, 22, 1971.
Ap. J., 189, 187, 1974.
Photometry (I.R. 1-10 microns):
M.N.R.A.S., 164, 155, 1973.
Ap. J. (Letters), 191, L19, 1974.
Spectrum:
A.J., 72, 821, 1967.
Bull. A.A.S., 1, 256, 1969.
Ap. J., 189, 187, 1974.
Spectrophotometry:
Ap. J., 189, 187, 1974.
M.N.R.A.S., 168, 109, 1974.

34. 1964RC1...C...0000d
Re:NGC 3783
Very small, very bright nucleus. (r): 0.6 arcmin x 0.5 arcmin. Faint outer
arms. There is a bright star 1.2 arcmin south-following.
HA 88, 2 classification E: is an error.


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