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Date and Time of the Query: 2019-08-24 T02:40:29 PDT
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Notes for object [HB89] 0332-403

9 note(s) found in NED.


1. 2016A&A...590A..40B
Re:[HB89] 0332-403
[HB89] 0332-403: the redshift of this source, which is by far the most
luminous BL Lac in our sample, is difficult to determine. We use z =
1.351, which is based on a single weak Mg II emission line (Bergeron et
al. 2011) and is consistent with the photometric redshift of this source
(Rau et al. 2012, z = 1.47^+0.11^ _-0.12_). If the source classification
as a BL Lac is correct,

2. 2016A&A...590A..40B
Re:PKS 0332-403
[HB89] 0332-403: the redshift of this source, which is by far the most
luminous BL Lac in our sample, is difficult to determine. We use z =
1.351, which is based on a single weak Mg ii emission line (Bergeron et
al. 2011) and is consistent with the photometric redshift of this source
(Rau et al. 2012, z = 1.47^+0.1^1 _-0.12_). If the source classification
as a BL Lac is correct, PKS 0332-403 would be one of only two BL Lac
objects with z > 1.3 in the Fermi 2FGL sample (Rau et al. 2012).
However, the classification of this source as a BL Lac by Veron-Cetty
& Veron (2006) does not seem to be very secure. It seems to go back to
Impey & Tapia (1990), who found that PKS 0332-403 has a high degree of
polarization (14.7%) above their 2.5% for classifying sources as blazars,
but little further work appears to have been done on classifying PKS
0332-403. The more specialized catalog of BL Lacs by Padovani& Giommi
(1995) did not contain PKS 0332-403. The updated version of that catalog,
version 4.2 of the Roma-BZCAT catalog (Massaro et al. 2009), lists PKS
0332-403 as only a "BL Lac candidate". Torniainen et al. (2008) and
Tornikoski et al. (2001) are more conservative and list PKS 0332-403 as a
highly polarized quasar and possibly a GPS source.

3. 2005A&A...435..839T
Re:0332-403
4.2 Previously identified inverted-spectrum sources
B0332-403: this source is an HPQ (z = 1.445). It was identified as a
GPS source by Tornikoski et al. (2001) but with all the new additional
data the spectrum is rather flat.

4. 2004ApJS..155...33S
Re:VSOP J0334-4008
The redshift for this source is quoted from Hewitt & Burbidge (1987),
although there appears to be little support for this value.
Drinkwater et al. (1997) were unable to find a redshift for this
source. The area subtended by the core component is less than
0.07 mas^2^.

5. 2002A&A...386...97J
Re:PKS B0332-403
The redshift of 1.445 in PKSCAT90 appears in the two redshift
catalogues (Hewitt & Burbidge, 1993, Cat. ; Veron-Cetty &
Veron, 1998ESOSR..18....1V) with circular references to each other or
to a third catalogue which has no such redshift in it (Barbieri et
al., 1975MmSAI..46..461B). The object is bright at 18mag; but despite
this, Drinkwater et al. (1997MNRAS.284...85D) obtained no redshift
from their optical spectrum. The literature does not indicate the
origin of the redshift value and it must be regarded as extremely
dubious.

6. 2001AJ....121.1306T
Re:[HB89] 0332-403
B0332-403 (z = 1.445 is often quoted, but Shen et al. (1998) point out
that this redshift, although widely used in the literature, may be
incorrect). - This source is an HPQ (p = 14.8%; Impey & Tapia 1990). This
source has not been listed in the published lists of GPS sources or
candidates, but based on the comment by Shimmins, Bolton, & Peterson (1971)
and the generally accepted definition of a GPS, Shen et al. (1998) mention
that this source could be classified as a gigahertz-peaked spectrum source.
Our data confirm the GPS nature of its spectrum, showing a spectrum that is
inverted up to 5 GHz.

7. 2000ApJS..131...95F
Re:VSOP J0334-4008
J0334-4008. - Our image is not consistent with the one at 5 GHz by
Shen et al. (1998), which shows an extension in the opposite direction
to that seen in our image. A redshift of 1.445 is widely quoted for this
source, but there is little to support this value. Drinkwater et al.
(1997) were unable to measure a redshift for this source.

8. 1998AJ....115.1357S
Re:PKS 0332-403
PKS 0332-403 (Fig. 1c).--This source is a highly polarized quasar (Impey & Tapia
1988, 1990). It has an inverted spectrum that peaks at around 5 GHz (Shimmins et
al. 1971) and could be classified as a gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) source
(cf. O'Dea, Baum, & Stanghellini 1991). Its redshift of z=1.445 has been widely
used in the literature without clear justification. This value is from the
Catalogue of Quasi Stellar-Objects (Barbieri, Capaccioli, & Zambon 1975), in
which the reference was incorrect. A new measurement should be made to confirm
its redshift.
The arcsecond structure of PKS 0332-403 is dominated by an unresolved core from
6 and 20 cm VLA observations (Perley 1982). Preston et al. (1985) detected a
correlated flux of 0.17+/-0.03 Jy, in contrast to a total flux at 2.3 GHz of
4.0+/-0.4 Jy. Single-baseline measurements at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz were also made by
Morabito et al. (1986). Our high-resolution image revealed a strong compact core
and a weak unresolved feature to the east (see Table 4). The derived Doppler
factor from the ROSAT 0.1-2.4 keV observations (Brinkmann, Siebert, & Boller
1994) is greater than 3.6.

9. 1997ApJ...478..492C
Re:PKS 0332-403
This object was observed in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) with a flux
between 0.1 - 2.4 keV of (1.75 +/- 0.6) x 10^-12^ ergs cm^-2^ s^-1^
(Brinkmann, Siebert, & Boller 1994). This is in reasonable agreement with
the ASCA flux of approximately (0.96 +/- 0.1) x 10^-12^ ergs cm^-2^ s^-1^
extrapolated between 0.1 - 2.4 keV and corrected for absorption. The ASCA
observations were studied by S96, who derived spectral parameters
consistent with our results.


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