NASA/IPAC EXTRAGALACTIC DATABASE
Date and Time of the Query: 2019-03-26 T07:49:33 PDT
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For refcode 1992ApJ...399...76K:
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Copyright by American Astronomical Society. Reproduced by permission
1992ApJ...399...76K INFRARED EMISSION AND MASS LOSS FROM EVOLVED STARS IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES G. R. KNAPP AND J. E. GUNN Princeton University Observatory, Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 AND C. G. WYNN-WILLIAMS Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 Received 1991 November 26; accepted 1992 May 4 ABSTRACT Small aperture 10.2 micron measurements of normal elliptical galaxies show that for almost all of these galaxies the 12 micron emission seen by IRAS is extended on the scale of the galaxy. NGC 1052 and NGC 3998 are exceptions to this; much of their 10-12 micron emission comes from the inner regions of the galaxies and may be associated with their active nuclei, as is the case for many radio galaxies. The distribution of the infrared light and the infrared colors of elliptical galaxies suggest that the most plausible source of the 12 micron emission is photospheric and circumstellar emission from cool evolved red giant stars. The 12 micron emission is well in excess of that expected from photospheric emission alone; about 40% of it probably comes from circumstellar dust. The 12 and 2.2 micron measurements are used to derive a total mass-loss rate of 0.0021 L_2.2_/L_sun_ M_sun_ Gyr^-1^ for the evolved giant stars in elliptical galaxies in excellent agreement with earlier and completely independent estimates based on optical luminosities and stellar evolutionary considerations. Subject headings: galaxies: elliptical and lenticular cD - galaxies: stellar content - infrared: galaxies - stars: late-type - stars: mass loss
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