NASA/IPAC EXTRAGALACTIC DATABASE
Date and Time of the Query: 2018-11-17 T09:37:14 PST
Help | Comment | NED Home

For refcode 1995ApJ...445..578D:
Retrieve 11 NED objects in this reference.
Please click here for ADS abstract

NED Abstract

Copyright by American Astronomical Society. Reproduced by permission
1995ApJ...445..578D COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF ROSAT OBSERVATIONS OF GROUPS AND CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES LAURENCE P. DAVID, CHRISTINE JONES, AND WILLIAM FORMAN Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 Received 1994 September 26; accepted 1994 December 1 ABSTRACT We have combined ROSAT PSPC and optical observations of a sample of groups and clusters of galaxies to determine the fundamental parameters of these systems (e.g., the dark matter distribution, gas mass fraction, baryon mass fraction, mass-to-light ratio, and the ratio of total-to- luminous mass). Imaging X-ray spectroscopy of groups and clusters show that the gas is essentially isothermal beyond the central region, indicating that the total mass density (mostly dark matter) scales as {rho}_dark_ is proportional to r^-2^. The density profile of the hot X-ray-emitting gas is fairly flat in groups with {rho}_gas_ is proportional to r^1.0^ and becomes progressively steeper in hotter richer systems, with {rho}_gas_ is proportional to r^2.0^ in the richest clusters. These results show, that in general, the hot X-ray-emitting gas is the most extended mass component in groups and clusters, the galaxies are the most centrally concentrated component, and the dark matter is intermediate between the two. The flatter density profile of the hot gas compared to the dark matter produces a gas mass fraction that increases with radius within each object. There is also a clear trend of increasing gas mass fraction (from 2% to 30%) between elliptical galaxies and rich clusters due to the greater detectable extent of the X-ray emission in richer systems. For the few systems in which the X-ray emission can be traced to the virial radius (where the overdensity {delta}~200), the gas mass fraction (essentially the baryon mass fraction) approaches a roughly constant value of 30%, suggesting that this is the true primordial value. Based on standard big bang nucleosynthesis, the large baryon mass fraction implies that {OMEGA} = 0.1-0.2. The antibiased gas distribution suggests that feedback from galaxy formation and hydrodynamics play important roles in the formation of structure on the scale of galaxies to rich clusters. All the groups and clusters in our sample have mass-to-light ratios of M/L_V_ ~ 100-150 M_sun_/L_sun_, which strongly contrasts with the traditional view that the mass-to-light ratio of rich clusters is significantly greater than individual galaxies or groups with M/L_V_~ 250-300 M_sun_/L_sun_. We also show that M/L_V_ is essentially constant within the virial radius of clusters (where {delta} >~ 200), which is consistent with the peaks formalism of biased galaxy formation. While the mass-to-light ratios of groups and clusters are comparable (indicating a constant mass fraction of optically luminous material), the ratio of the total mass-to-luminous mass (gas plus stars) monotonically decreases between galaxies and clusters. The decrease in M_tot_/M_lum_ arises from two factors: (1) the composition of baryonic matter varies from a predominance of optically luminous material (stars) on the scale of galaxies (~10 kpc) to a predominance of X-ray luminous material (hot gas) on the scale of rich clusters (~1 Mpc), and (2) the hot gas has a more extended spatial distribution than the gravitating matter. The observed decrease in M_tot_/M_lum_ in between galaxies and clusters indicates that the universe actually becomes "brighter" on mass scales between 10^12^ and 10^15^ M_sun_, in the sense that a greater fraction of the gravitating mass is observable. Subject headings: cosmology: theory - galaxies: clusters: general - galaxies: fundamental parameters - X-rays: galaxies
Retrieve 11 NED objects in this reference.
Please click here for ADS abstract

Back to NED Home