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Date and Time of the Query: 2019-06-20 T08:46:08 PDT
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For refcode 2003ApJ...590..225C:
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2003ApJ...590..225C XMM-Newton Observations of the Perseus Cluster. I. The Temperature and Surface Brightness Structure Churazov, E.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Bohringer, H. Abstract. We present preliminary results of a XMM-Newton 50 ks observation of the Perseus Cluster that provides an unprecedented view of the central 0.5 Mpc region. The projected gas temperature declines smoothly by a factor of 2 from a maximum value of ~ 7 keV in the outer regions to just above 3 keV at the cluster center. Over this same range, the heavy-element abundance rises slowly from 0.4 to 0.5 solar as the radius decreases from 14' to 5', and then it rises to a peak of almost 0.7 solar at 1.25' before declining to 0.4 at the center. The global east-west asymmetry of the gas temperature and surface brightness distributions, approximately aligned with the chain of bright galaxies, suggests an ongoing merger, although the modest degree of the observed asymmetry certainly excludes a major merger interpretation. The chain of galaxies probably traces the filament along which accretion started some time ago and is continuing at the present time. A cold and dense (low-entropy) cluster core like Perseus is probably well "protected" against the penetration of the gas of infalling groups and poor clusters, whereas in noncooling core clusters such as Coma and A1367, infalling subclusters can penetrate deeply into the core region. In Perseus, gas associated with infalling groups may be stripped completely at the outskirts of the main cluster and only compression waves (shocks) may reach the central regions. We argue, and show supporting simulations, that the passage of such a wave(s) can qualitatively explain the overall horseshoe shaped appearance of the gas temperature map (the hot horseshoe surrounds the colder, low-entropy core) as well as other features of the Perseus Cluster core. These simulations also show that as compression waves traverse the cluster core, they can induce oscillatory motion of the cluster gas that can generate multiple sharp "edges" on opposite sides of the central galaxy. Gas motions induced by mergers may be a natural way to explain the high frequency of "edges" seen in clusters with cooling cores. Keywords: Galaxies: Cooling Flows, Galaxies: Active, Galaxies: Clusters: Individual: Name: Perseus, Galaxies: Individual: NGC Number: NGC 1275, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: Galaxies: Clusters
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