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Date and Time of the Query: 2019-05-22 T10:15:56 PDT
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For refcode 2006ApJ...652.1122D:
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2006ApJ...652.1122D Hidden Trigger for the Giant Starburst Arc in M83? Ruben J. Diaz, Horacio Dottori, Maria P. Aguero, Evencio Mediavilla, Irapuan Rodrigues, and Damian Mast Abstract. The huge star formation events that occur at some galactic centers do not provide enough clues as to their origin, since the morphological signatures of the triggering mechanism are smeared out in the timescale of a few orbital revolutions of the galaxy core. Our high spatial resolution three-dimensional near-infrared spectroscopy for the first time reveals that a previously known hidden mass concentration is located exactly at the youngest end of a giant star-forming arc. This location, the inferred average cluster ages, and the dynamical times clearly indicate that the interloper has left behind a spur of violent star formation in M83, in a transient event lasting less than one orbital revolution. The study of the origin (bar funneling or cannibalized satellite) and fate (black hole merging or giant stellar cluster) of this system could provide clues to the question of core growing and morphological evolution in grand-design spiral galaxies. In particular, our TreeSPH numerical modeling suggests that the two nuclei could coalesce, forming a single massive core in about 60 million years or less. This work is based on observations made at the Gemini South Telescope. Key words: Galaxies: Active, Galaxies: Individual: M83, Galaxies: ISM, Galaxies: Kinematics and Dynamics, Galaxies: Nuclei, Galaxies: Starburst
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