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Date and Time of the Query: 2019-06-24 T03:46:30 PDT
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For refcode 2010ApJ...711..671K:
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2010ApJ...711..671K The SPLASH Survey: Internal Kinematics, Chemical Abundances, and Masses of the Andromeda I, II, III, VII, X, and XIV Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies Kalirai, Jason S.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Geha, Marla C.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kirby, Evan N.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J.; Wolf, Joe Abstract. We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations of hundreds of individual stars along the sightline to the first three of the Andromeda (M31) dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies to be discovered, And I, II, and III, and combine them with recent spectroscopic studies by our team of three additional M31 dSphs, And VII, X, and XIV, as a part of the SPLASH Survey (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo). Member stars of each dSph are isolated from foreground Milky Way dwarf stars and M31 field contamination using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic diagnostics. Our final spectroscopic sample of member stars in each dSph, for which we measure accurate radial velocities with a median uncertainty (random plus systematic errors) of 4-5 km s^-1^, includes 80 red giants in And I, 95 in And II, 43 in And III, 18 in And VII, 22 in And X, and 38 in And XIV. The sample of confirmed members in the six dSphs is used to derive each system's mean radial velocity, intrinsic central velocity dispersion, mean abundance, abundance spread, and dynamical mass. This combined data set presents us with a unique opportunity to perform the first systematic comparison of the global properties (e.g., metallicities, sizes, and dark matter masses) of one-third of Andromeda's total known dSph population with Milky Way counterparts of the same luminosity. Our overall comparisons indicate that the family of dSphs in these two hosts have both similarities and differences. For example, we find that the luminosity-metallicity relation is very similar between L ~ 10^5^ and 10^7^ L_sun_, suggesting that the chemical evolution histories of each group of dSphs are similar. The lowest luminosity M31 dSphs appear to deviate from the relation, possibly suggesting tidal stripping. Previous observations have noted that the sizes of M31's brightest dSphs are systematically larger than Milky Way satellites of similar luminosity. At lower luminosities between L = 10^4^ and 10^6^ L_sun_, we find that the sizes of dSphs in the two hosts significantly overlap and that four of the faintest M31 dSphs are smaller than Milky Way counterparts. The first dynamical mass measurements of six M31 dSphs over a large range in luminosity indicate similar mass-to-light ratios compared to Milky Way dSphs among the brighter satellites, and smaller mass-to-light ratios among the fainter satellites. Combined with their similar or larger sizes at these luminosities, these results hint that the M31 dSphs are systematically less dense than Milky Way dSphs. The implications of these similarities and differences for general understanding of galaxy formation and evolution are summarized. Key words: dark matter, galaxies: abundances, galaxies: dwarf, galaxies: individual: And I And II And III And VII And X And XIV, techniques: photometric, techniques: spectroscopic
Retrieve 47 NED objects in this reference.
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