Proceedings for the Frank N. Bash Symposium, October 9-11, 2011, Austin, Texas
astro-ph/1201.4820

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FIRST LIGHT: A BRIEF REVIEW

John H. Wise *


Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA


Abstract: The first stars in the universe are thought to be massive, forming in dark matter halos with masses around 106 solar masses. Recent simulations suggest that these metal-free (Population III) stars may form in binary or multiple systems. Because of their high stellar masses and small host halos, their feedback ionizes the surrounding 3 kpc of intergalactic medium and drives the majority of the gas from the potential well. The next generation of stars then must form in this gas-poor environment, creating the first galaxies that produce the majority of ionizing radiation during cosmic reionization. I will review the latest developments in the field of Population III star formation and feedback and its impact on galaxy formation prior to reionization. In particular, I will focus on the numerical simulations that have demonstrated this sequence of events, ultimately leading to cosmic reionization.


Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

POPULATION III STAR FORMATION

POPULATION III RADIATIVE FEEDBACK
H II regions from Population III stars
Contribution to reionization

SUPERNOVAE FROM POPULATION III

HIGH-REDSHIFT DWARF GALAXIES

SUMMARY

REFERENCES



* The speaker appreciated the hospitality and efforts by the symposium organizers and the invitation to speak at this venue. This review covers some of my own work, which could not have been accomplished without the help of my collaborators, Tom Abel, Marcelo A. Alvarez, Renyue Cen, Michael L. Norman, and Matthew J. Turk.

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